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Top End Fine Wines  -  Collector's Dream Selection

The Collector's Dream  Selection  wines are considered the top of Bordeaux. The First Growths, Ausone, Cheval Blanc
and Pétrus are sometimes referred to as the "Big Eight" of Bordeaux.  Some are classified as first-growths and others
are not classified, but sometimes the market value is higher than the first-growths.

The following wine brands usually are among the best in a vintage.  Of course, this isn’t always the case, and any given
first-growth can make wines inferior to those from lesser-ranked estates selling at a fraction of the cost.  Our selections
include only certain vintages that according to our knowledge are the best.

Some properties have been neglected, while others have been significantly improved upon.  There are many wine
properties that are performing well above their ranking, and others performing well below.

In 1855, Napoleon III asked Bordeaux’s top chateau owners to rate their wines from best to worst for the Paris Exhibition,
a fair.

The Medoc:  In 1855, the chateaux of Medoc and one chateau in graves were classified into four Premiers Crus (First
Growths), fourteen Deuxiemes Crus (Second Growths), fourteen Troisiemes Crus (Third Growths), ten Quatriemes Crus
(Fourth Growths), and eighteen Cinqiemes Crus (Fifth Growths).

St. Emilion:  In 1954, the chateaux of St.  Emilion were classified into eleven Premiers Grands Crus Classes and fifty-three
Grands Crus Classes.  The classification, which is revised every decade, was last updated in 1996.

Never classified:  Pomerol, as well as Entre-Deux-Mers, Fronsac, Canon Fronsac, and other outlying areas.

Curiously, as I’ve said, the classified chateaux were not from all over Bordeaux.  In fact, they were located only in the
Medoc and in Sauternes and Barsac.  There was one exception, Chateau Haut-Brion in Graves.

Unveiling a first-time ever classification of important wines may have made the Paris Exhibition more exciting, but it also
started a political and ideological battle that continues to this day.

Those opposed to the classification wonder why a wine that sold for the most money in 1855 should still be rated one of
the best wines in Bordeaux today?


Bordeaux Collector's   Dream  Selection.  The wines were packed by the château in original wooden cases. They are in
perfect condition, regarding level of wine, label, or cap; maintained at optimum levels of care in Bordeaux cellars or in the
of Corsham with perfect
temperature and humidity, and a depth that eliminates natural light and vibration for perfect
cellarage. (Bordeaux Certificates).
























St. Emilion:  In 1954, the chateaux of St.  Emilion were classified into eleven Premiers Grands Crus Classes and fifty-three
Grands Crus Classes.  The classification, which is revised every decade, was last updated in 1996.

Never classified:  Pomerol, as well as Entre-Deux-Mers, Fronsac, Canon Fronsac, and other outlying areas.

Curiously, as I’ve said, the classified chateaux were not from all over Bordeaux.  In fact, they were located only in the
Medoc and in Sauternes and Barsac.  There was one exception, Chateau Haut-Brion in Graves.

Unveiling a first-time ever classification of important wines may have made the Paris Exhibition more exciting, but it also
started a political and ideological battle that continues to this day.

Those opposed to the classification wonder why a wine that sold for the most money in 1855 should still be rated one of
the best wines in Bordeaux today?

Bordeaux Collector's   Dream  Selection.  The wines were packed by the château in original wooden cases. They are in
perfect condition, regarding level of wine, label, or cap; maintained at optimum levels of care in Bordeaux cellars or in the
United Kingdom, in the finest wine storage service in the world (Octavian Vaults), where lie 100 feet below the Bath stone
hills of Corsham with perfect temperature and humidity, and a depth that eliminates natural light and vibration for perfect
cellarage. (Bordeaux Certificates).
The Collector's Dream  Selection  wines are considered the top of Bordeaux.
The First Growths, Ausone, Cheval Blanc and Pétrus are sometimes referred to
as the "Big Eight" of Bordeaux.  Some are classified as first-growths and others
are not classified, but sometimes the market value is higher than the first-
growths.

The following wine brands usually are among the best in a vintage.  Of course,
this isn’t always the case, and any given first-growth can make wines inferior to
those from lesser-ranked estates selling at a fraction of the cost.  Our selections
include only certain vintages that according to our knowledge are the best.

Some properties have been neglected, while others have been significantly
improved upon.  There are many wine properties that are performing well above
their ranking, and others performing well below.

In 1855, Napoleon III asked Bordeaux’s top chateau owners to rate their wines
from best to worst for the Paris Exhibition, a fair.

The Medoc:  In 1855, the chateaux of Medoc and one chateau in graves were
classified into four Premiers Crus (First Growths), fourteen Deuxiemes Crus
(Second Growths), fourteen Troisiemes Crus (Third Growths), ten Quatriemes
Crus (Fourth Growths), and eighteen Cinqiemes Crus (Fifth Growths).
CHÂTEAU LAFITE ROTHSCHILD
already vineyards on the property at the time when the Ségur family organized the vineyard in the 17th century, and
Lafite began to earn its reputation as a great winemaking estate. Jacques de Ségur is credited with the planting of
the Lafite vineyard in the 1670's and in the early 1680's. In 1695, Jacques de Ségur's heir, Alexandre, married the
heiress of Château Latour, and they gave birth to Nicolas-Alexandre de Ségur. The fiefs of Lafite and Latour were
thus unified at the beginning of their estate legacy.  Beginning in 1716, Maquis de Ségur would consolidate Lafite's
initial successes. He improved the winemaking techniques and above all enhanced the prestige of fine wines in
foreign markets and the Versailles court. He became known as "The Wine Prince", and Lafite's wine became "The
King's Wine", with the support of the Marechal de Richelieu. The Marquis did not have any sons, and his property
was divided between his four daughters. Lafite was thus separated form Latour, despite its remaining in the family
and being governed by the same steward until 1785. After the French Revolion in 1789, the Château was sold to a
Dutch wine merchant. In 1868, Baron James de Rothschild purchased Château Lafite, since then, five generations
have owned the estate
CHÂTEAU LATOUR
When one evokes the name Château Latour, one immediately thinks of a fortified tower built on the banks of an
estuary overlooking the water, the vines and the marshes. This tower really did exist and a glorious past is attached
to it. The Tower of Saint-Lambert was propably built during the 14th century. In 1378, Château Latour "en
Saint-Maubert", called later Château La Tour and then Château Latour, entered the annals of history. The existing
tower, which has nothing to do with the orginal one, did not give its name to the vineyard. This tower is indeed a
pigeon house. It would appear that the domaine of Latour remained under joint ownership until the end of the
sixteenth century. By the end of the 16th century the proprietors had been reduced to a family called Mullet. At the end
of the 17th century, after a succession of sales, the Latour estate became the property of the Ségur family. It is in
1718 with the Marquis de Ségur, that the great history of the vineyard starts. "The Prince of Vines" increased the
family holding with the acquisition of Mouton (Rothschild) and Calon (Ségur). During the first half of the 18th century,
the land of Latour was run in accordance with the possibilities given by the other vineyards of the De Ségur. But at the
death of the Marquis, Latour received the necessary care and investment it required and started to develop its full
potential, and then to be highly recognized around the world, thanks to the recon quest of the British market. The
reputation of Château Latour was consolidated during the 19th century, classified as First Growth in 1855. In 1963,
the heirs of the Marquis de Ségur sold 75% of the Château Latour shares; the new shareholders became "Harveys
of Bristol", and "Hallminster ltd", both British Companies. In 1989, Allied Lyons, already owner of 25% of the shares,
shareholder. In July 1993, Allied Lyons decided to sell their shares to François PINAULT. Entrepreneur and
Businessman, Mr Pinault finally brought Château Latour back into French hands.
CHÂTEAU MARGAUX
It was already known in the 12th century and at that time had the name "La Mothe de Margaux" but there were not yet
any vines. By the end of the 17th century, Château Margaux covered 265 hectares (654 acres), a surface area which it
never abandoned thereafter. In 1705, the London Gazette offered the first sale of a great Bordeaux wines: 230 barrels
of "Margoose". It was at the beginning of the 18th century that the great wines of Bordeaux started their rise to fame,
and an informal classification was established. The French Revolution brought this golden century for Bordeaux to
an end. Châtea Margaux was sold by the revolutionaries by auction as National Property. Laure de Fumel bought the
estate. She was the last descendant of the Lestonnac, Pontac and Audèle families, all of whom were related and
who had carefully watched over Margaux for three centuries. The new purchaser in 1801, Bertrand Drouat, built in
place of the gothic manor, the residence that we admire today. In the classification of 1855, only four growths were
ranked "First Great Classified Growth" and Margaux was the only one to be marked 20 out of 20. It is in 1977 that
André Mentzelopoulos bought Margaux to Pierre and Bernard Ginestet. He died in 1980, too young and too quickly for
him to be able to enjoy the revival of his château Margaux. His daughter, Corinne immediately took passionately to
the cause of Margaux. Since 1993, Paul Pontallier has been administring the estate.  
CHÂTEAU MOUTON ROTHSCHILD
a Premier Cru Classé from the Bordeaux region and one of the world's greatest wines, is owned by Baroness
Philippine de Rothschild, daughter of the legendary Baron Philippe. The estate includes 205 acres of vines at
Pauillac planted with Cabernet Sauvignon (77%), Merlot (11%), Cabernet Franc (10%), and Petit Verdot (2%). It
benefits from exceptionally good natural conditions, both in the quality of the soil and the situation of its vines and
their exposure to the sun. From the grape to the bottle, Château Mouton Rothschild receives meticulous attention
to detail, combining a respect for tradition with the latest techniques. Harvesting is carried out by hand, and the
wine is matured in new oak casks. In 1853, Baron Nathaniel de Rothschild, a member of the English branch of the
family, bought Château Brane Mouton and renamed it Château Mouton Rothschild. In 1922, his great-grandson
Baron Philippe de Rothschild (1902-1988) decided to take the future of the estate into his own hands. The Victory
year 1945, marked the start of a fascinating collection of works of art, created every year for the Mouton label by
famous painters. In 1973, after twenty-year battle, Baron Philippe de Rothschild obtained a revision of the 1855
classification and Mouton was officially recognized as a First Growth. In 1988, Baroness Philippine de Rothschild
succeeded her father Baron Philippe.
CHÂTEAU CHEVAL BLANC  
The present-day Cheval Blanc vineyards had vines at least as
far back as the 18th century, as shown by Belleyme's map of
the region dated 1764. The vineyard is in a single block, and
borders on the Pomerol appellation. An outstanding terroir and
unusual proportions of Cabernet Franc and Merlot give this
great wine an absolutely unique flavor. Chateau Cheval Blanc
has had a greater number of outstanding vintages than any
other classified first growth over the past century. Another
unusual characteristic of Cheval Blanc is that once it reaches
its peak, it maintains it for a very long time. This admirable
wine is powerful, soft, rich, round and silky. It has tremendous
fruit and elegance as well as exceptional quality from year to
year.
PÉTRUS   
There is no official classification of Pomerol, but Petrus is
unofficially recognized as a Premiere cru. It fetches a much
higher price than any other red wine in the world, wine market,
and at auction it achieves even higher prices relative to the
rest.   This Bordeaux was served at Queen Elizabeth's
wedding in 1947. In America, Pétrus become the favorite wine
of the Kennedy’s.   

The wine is exceptional and its price always increases, but at
any price Pétrus  will always be sold.  The price is irrelevant
because it is a limited production due the small size of the
property and the strong demand of every educated palate
wanting Pétrus, regardless of its cost.
 It is not enough to
have the money to buy this prized wine, but it is also
necessary to be part of   privileged clients of selected
distributors of Pétrus.    
WARNING: Wine
Fraud is on the
increase
As wine becomes more of
a global product,
Bordeaux, in particular.
More and more criminals
are clicking onto the fact
that they can profit from
robberies
Wine is relatively easy to
fake and fraudsters have
been selling wine since
time immemorial.    The
French government has
an extensive anti-fraud
agency to prevent and
often investigate dubious
merchandise.  The US
government could
prosecute counterfeit wine
under federal fraud laws.  
The Wall Street Journal
reported that the FBI is
investigating the sold of
counterfeit wines.
The best protection
against such fraud is to
select your sources
with due diligence.
Fine wine distributed by
Exceptional Wines has
been laid down in the
correct storage conditions
essential for its optimal
maturation, and were
directly transported in
temperature and humidity
controlled  containers in
their original cases and its
authenticity is always
certified.
Bordeax Collector's Dream Selection are in the original wooden cases in which
the wine was packed by the chateau at the time of bottling. Conditions are
maintained at optimum levels of humidity and
temperature. Prices and
inventories change frequently please request a quote.
Château  Haut
Brion packed by
the château in
original wooden
Case of 1 bottle
Chateau Mouton
Rothschild 1993

"Censored"  Balthus label